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US Green party puts up a fight in election race

Nov 3rd, 2012 | By | Category: Editor's Picks, Latest News, Most Popular, News

IMAGE: AP/Elise Amendola

BEING arrested at a presidential debate did not deter Jill Stein, the US Green party presidential candidate, from airing her views.

Getting arrested appears to be the best way of getting noticed for such minor parties in a system saturated by Republican and Democrat politics.

Stein, who was arrested and handcuffed to a metal chair for eight hours last week, was arrested again this week.

She was arrested trying to bring food to activists protesting against an oil pipeline being built in Texas this week.

Last week, Stein and her vice presidential candidate Cheri Honkala were charged with disorderly conduct attempting to take part in the second presidential debate.

The pair said they were taken to a remote police warehouse and not allowed to make phone calls after they protested against their exclusion from the debate between Obama and Romney at Hofstra University, New York.

They and several other third parties are on the presidential ballot form.

Although the party has never gained much of the popular vote, focus on US Greens increased this year with the bid by comedienne Roseanne Barr for the party’s presidential nomination.

After being defeated, Barr dropped out of the party and is now the presidential candidate for the Peace and Freedom party.

New Zealand Green party MP Gareth Hughes says Stein is campaigning hard within a difficult political structure.

NZ Greens support Green parties around the world by donating 1% of their salaries to the global Green network, this money helps Green parties keep in touch.

“It’s difficult to get a look in there, the US political structure focuses on the Democrats and the Republicans,” Hughes says.

In a recent CNN poll, Stein polls at 3% of the vote, close to her third party competitor Gary Johnson, the Libertarian party nominee, sitting at 4%.

Talking about her arrest at the debate in a Salon.com interview Ms Stein said she and Honkala were trying to start an “open and democratic debate.”

“We weren’t sure what the consequences would be, but we were determined to clarify that it wasn’t just third-party candidates but the voters who were being locked out,” Stein told Salon News.

“We will be on the ballots for 85 percent of potential voters, and those voters deserve to know what their choices are.”

Hughes says it is great to see the US Greens taking action and that the US has many of same issues as NZ like huge unemployment and sourcing energy.

“She’s putting her body on the line which is impressive.”
The US Green party, established in 1996, says on its website its roots emerged in the 70s from the now defunct Values Party in New Zealand and other ‘green’ movements across the globe.

The Values Party is seen as the world’s first environmentalist party and many of its former members like Jeanette Fitzsimons became part of New Zealand’s Green Party, established in 1990.

Stein’s main policy is the ‘Green New Deal’ which outlines reducing military spending, employment programs, sustainable energy, increasing access for voters and financial reforms.

Other candidates in the last three US elections have only ever received under 3% of the American vote, with Greens candidate Ralph Nader receiving 2.74% (2,882,955 votes) in the 2000 election.

Since the 2000 election however, the Green vote has decreased, barely registering in the 2008 election with 0.12% of the vote.

“Third party” is used to describe political parties other than the two major parties – the Democratic Party and the Republican Party. There are also “independent candidates” who run for office with no formal party affiliation.
The Libertarian, US Green, and the Americans Elect parties are “third parties” that theoretically could win if Americans voted for them.
Ross Perot, an independent who ran in the 1992 election, is the most successful third-party person to gain a substantial amount of the vote (18.9%) since the 1912 election in which former president Theodore Roosevelt gained 27% (after two terms as a Republican President).

 

NEW ZEALAND Green MPs donate 1% of their salaries to the global Green network, and some of that money is going to help presidential candidate Jill Stein.

Getting arrested appears to be the best way of getting noticed for such minor parties in a system saturated by Republican and Democrat politics.

Stein, who was arrested and handcuffed to a metal chair for eight hours last week, was arrested again this week.

She was arrested trying to bring food to activists protesting against an oil pipeline being built in Texas this week.

Last week, Stein and her vice presidential candidate Cheri Honkala were charged with disorderly conduct attempting to take part in the second presidential debate.

The pair said they were taken to a remote police warehouse and not allowed to make phone calls after they protested against their exclusion from the debate between Obama and Romney at Hofstra University, New York.

They and several other third parties are on the presidential ballot form.

Although the party has never gained much of the popular vote, focus on US Greens increased this year with the bid by comedienne Roseanne Barr for the party’s presidential nomination.

After being defeated, Barr dropped out of the party and is now the presidential candidate for the Peace and Freedom party.

New Zealand Green party MP Gareth Hughes says Stein is campaigning hard within a difficult political structure.

NZ Greens support Stein and her party by donating 1% of their salaries to the global Green network. The money also goes to other global Green parties.

“It’s difficult to get a look in there, the US political structure focuses on the Democrats and the Republicans,” Hughes says.

In a recent CNN poll, Stein polls at 3% of the vote, close to her third party competitor Gary Johnson, the Libertarian party nominee, sitting at 4%.

Talking about her arrest at the debate in a Salon.com interview Ms Stein said she and Honkala were trying to start an “open and democratic debate.”

“We weren’t sure what the consequences would be, but we were determined to clarify that it wasn’t just third-party candidates but the voters who were being locked out,” Stein told Salon News.

“We will be on the ballots for 85 percent of potential voters, and those voters deserve to know what their choices are.”

Hughes says it is great to see the US Greens taking action and that the US has many of same issues as NZ like huge unemployment and sourcing energy.

“She’s putting her body on the line which is impressive.”

Defun

The US Green party, established in 1996, says on its website its roots emerged in the 70s from the now defunct Values Party in New Zealand and other ‘green’ movements across the globe.

The Values Party is seen as the world’s first environmentalist party and many of its former members like Jeanette Fitzsimons became part of New Zealand’s Green Party, established in 1990.

Stein’s main policy is the Green New Deal’ which outlines reducing military spending, employment programs, sustainable energy, increasing access for voters and financial reforms.

Other candidates in the last three US elections have only ever received under 3% of the American vote, with Greens candidate Ralph Nader receiving 2.74% (2,882,955 votes) in the 2000 election.

Since the 2000 election however, the Green vote has decreased, barely registering in the 2008 election with 0.12% of the vote.

“Third party” is used to describe political parties other than the two major parties – the Democratic Party and the Republican Party. There are also “independent candidates” who run for office with no formal party affiliation.

The Libertarian, US Green, and the Americans Elect parties are “third parties” that theoretically could win if Americans voted for them.

Ross Perot, an independent who ran in the 1992 election, is the most successful third-party person to gain a substantial amount of the vote (18.9%) since the 1912 election in which former president Theodore Roosevelt gained 27% (after two terms as a Republican President).

 

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